Sunday, September 29, 2013

The NRA ILA and other ways to give.

Our gun grabbing opponents scream all the time about gun manufacturers supplying money to the NRA. I read the ILA report every month in my American Rifleman magazine. Anyone with a brain, and maybe a first graders ability to read, can see that gun manufacturers are only a small amount of the giving every month. But in this month, October, I noticed some interesting other business donations.
Along with the 21 individuals that donated over 1000 dollars, totally at least $21,000 for the month NOT including "In Memory" contributions, There was a smattering of interesting businesses that I wanted to call out and applaud.

Cape Radiology from Missouri.
Universal Electric Company from Georgia.
ORCA Asset Management Group from Texas.
Tri Penn Tool Company of Pennsylvania.

These 4 businesses are NOT in the gun manufacturing business and have nothing direct to gain from supporting the NRA ILA.  But stand and applaud them I will.I hope you will do the same!
If each of these gave $1000.00 dollars, the total, with other for October would be well in excess of $35,000 dollars. That is the minimum. These people and businesses gave at least $1000.00.  So when you have an anti gunner attempting to give you the old, "Gun manufacturers pay for our lobby" argument. Tell them the facts.

Add to that, that 24 people left money to the ILA in their will as an In Memory contribution.

This is just another way we win. We are smarter in every way!!



Wednesday, September 4, 2013

When You Have the Facts On Your Side!

According to the latest available data from the Centers for Disease Control, drug overdoses were responsible for 38,329 deaths in 2010, 30,006 of which were unintentional.That's a rate of 105 every day, and that number doesn't take into account the 6,748 people treated every day for the misuse or abuse of drugs.
In comparison, traffic accidents were responsible for 33,687 deaths in 2010. Firearms killed 31,672 people, and 26,852 died as a result of falling.
The overdose epidemic is not a new phenomenon. The CDC reports that drug overdose death rates have risen steadily since 1992, seeing a 102 percent increase from 1999 to 2010. Drug overdose deaths first overtook traffic deaths in 2009 and continued to grow the subsequent year. Preliminary CDC estimates for 2011 suggest the trend has continued, though the report notes that the final number of overdose deaths may well be higher than the initial reported numbers, due to delays pending investigation of the cause of death.

Monday, September 2, 2013

The Guitarist






As a guitarist, I play many gigs. Recently I was asked by a funeral director to play at a graveside service for a homeless man. He had no family or friends, so the service was to be at a pauper’s cemetery in the back country. As I was not familiar with the backwoods, I got lost.  I finally arrived an hour late and saw the funeral guy had evidently gone and the hearse was nowhere in sight. There were only the diggers and crew left and they were eating lunch.  I felt badly and apologized to the men for being late. I went to the side of the grave and looked down and the vault lid was already in place. I didn’t know what else to do, so I started to play.  The workers put down their lunches and began to gather around. I played out my heart and soul for this man with no family and friends. I played like I’ve never played before for this homeless man.  And as I played ‘Amazing Grace,’ the workers began to weep. They wept, I wept, we all wept together. When I finished I packed up my guitar and started for my car. Though my head hung low, my heart was full.  As I opened the door to my car, I heard one of the workers say, “I never seen nothin’ like that before and I’ve been putting in septic tanks for twenty years.”  Apparently, I’m still lost…
As a guitarist, I play many gigs. Recently I was asked by a funeral director to play at a graveside service for a homeless man. He had no family or friends, so ...the service was to be at a pauper’s cemetery in the back country. As I was not familiar with the backwoods, I got lost.

I finally arrived an hour late and saw the funeral guy had evidently gone and the hearse was nowhere in sight. There were only the diggers and crew left and they were eating lunch.

I felt badly and apologized to the men for being late. I went to the side of the grave and looked down and the vault lid was already in place. I didn’t know what else to do, so I started to play.

The workers put down their lunches and began to gather around. I played out my heart and soul for this man with no family and friends. I played like I’ve never played before for this homeless man.

And as I played ‘Amazing Grace,’ the workers began to weep. They wept, I wept, we all wept together. When I finished I packed up my guitar and started for my car. Though my head hung low, my heart was full.

As I opened the door to my car, I heard one of the workers say, “I never seen nothin’ like that before and I’ve been putting in septic tanks for twenty years.”

Apparently, I’m still lost…
--

                               IN GOD WE TRUST
T